Author Archives: Roxanne Harris

Women Against Feminism

 

Black Women Against Feminism

Black Feminist who do you think funded the Feminist Movement? As it seems the roll of Eugenics, and the Roll of Racist White Women ex: Susan B. Anthony who recruited Black Women seem not to matter to Black Feminist…does it matter to Black Feminist on how the Feminist Movement/Women’s Liberation was funded in America?

Lets Take a Look===>

A) The Rockefeller’s- Funded the Women’s Liberation, provided Media coverage. They could not tax half the population before Women’s Liberation, rather than taxing one Gender, it is more profitable to tax both. Now the State becomes responsible for raising our Children at a Young age, the State and Entertainment Industry then establishes Culture (Women are the gatekeepers of Culture)—After the Feminist Movement Entertainment and Public Education became the gatekeepers.

B) Hugh Hefner (Play Boy)-Supported your “reproductive Rights”, the Sex Revolution, and the Feminist Wave of Political Lesbianism

C) The Ford Foundation Also Funded the Women’s Liberation Movement

D) Eugenics Movement in America (Followed social Darwinism “Survival of the Fittest” and saw Black People and Disabled people are genetically inferior ex: Margaret Sanger (Eugenics Prominent Feminist & Founder of Planned Parenthood to depopulate Black Population)…Since then we have had More Black Babies Aborted than we have had Lynchings, and we wonder why the Population Growth of Black’s in a America remains between 12-13%.

E) CIA- funded MS Magazine, inventing the second wave of Feminism. In 1958, Prominent Gloria Steinem Feminist was recruited by CIA´s Cord Meyers to direct an “informal group of activists” called the “Independent Research Service.

– Gloria Steinem, attended Communist-sponsored youth festivals in Europe, published a newspaper, reported on other participants, and helped to provoke riots.

– Clay Felker (CIA Agent). In the early 1960´s, became an editor at Esquire and published articles by Gloria Steinem which established her as a leading voice for the Feminist Movement. In 1968, as publisher of New York Magazine, he hired her as a contributing editor, and then editor of Ms. Magazine in 1971 funded by the CIA.

– The CIA´s “Project Mockingbird” involved the direct infiltration of the corporate media, a process that often included direct takeover of major news outlets. “By the early 1950´s,” writes Deborah Davis, in her book Katharine the Great : Katharine Graham and Her Washington Post Empire, the CIA owned respected members of the New York Times, Newsweek, CBS and other communication vehicles, plus stringers, four to six hundred in all.” In 1982 the CIA admitted that reporters on the CIA payroll have acted as case officers to agents in the field.

– Philip Graham, publisher of the Washington Post, who ran the operation until his “suicide” in 1963, boasted that “you could get a journalist cheaper than a good call girl, for a couple of hundred dollars a month.”

Do research beyond your College Classroom and Major Black Feminist, and question why you have joined the Feminist Movement.

______________________________________________________In this short interview clip Aaron Russo speaks on the Rockefeller Foundation’s role in the Feminist Movement.

~MAMA~AFRIKA~

The Hidden Skills That Could Change Your Job Search

The Hidden Skills That Could Change Your Job Search

Reposted from Job Search Success 

When experienced job seekers return to the job market, many  have a limited perception of the type of job they should do. Often the thinking is, “I did this for 10 years, so obviously that’s the kind of job I’ll go for now.”

But did you know you have a lot of other options out there?  Buried deep in your resume or in the recesses of your mind, there are skills that you’ve acquired along the way that you probably haven’t thought about in years and those skills could open doors to career opportunities you may never have thought of.

I’ll take an example of my friend. I’m helping her with her resume, and when we sat down and looked at her skills, I could see she was extremely marketable. Her resume was just a bit of a hot mess and wasn’t bringing all of those amazing skills to the forefront. When we deconstructed everything she had done, it was obvious that she could apply for five or six different types of jobs – which opened up her job search options tremendously.

Every experienced job seeker has a wealth of experience that could be applied to a lot of different jobs. By rediscovering your hidden skills, you’ll immediately recognize that you can expand your job search into different areas.

This week, I encourage you to try this exercise and uncover all of your hidden job skills:

  1. Look up job descriptions based on a general search term. For example, I looked up marketing jobs. Within that, I was able to get a list of tons of different types of marketing jobs where any number of my skills would be a fit. In some cases, I discovered new jobs that hadn’t existed when I was in the job market before, giving me new options for my career.
  2. De-construct your resume. Pull out all of your skills and put them into different categories, like sales, finance, events, or whatever makes sense for you.
  3. Go through each of those categories, one at a time, and visualize  what you used to do on a daily basis within those categories and write those down. Over time we forget just how much we used to do in a day, and THAT is where those hidden skills lie.
  4. Create a separate resume for each of those types of job. It’s all about perception. If you’re shooting for an accounting job, you’ll highlight all of the accounting-related skills and accomplishments. If it’s a management position, you’ll highlight all of those skills. Each resume will reflect your best skills and experience in each category.

Here’s an example of an office manager job description from Monster.com:

Office Manager Job Duties:

  • Maintains office services by organizing office operations and procedures; preparing payroll; controlling correspondence; designing filing systems; reviewing and approving supply requisitions; assigning and monitoring clerical functions.
  • Provides historical reference by defining procedures for retention, protection, retrieval, transfer, and disposal of records.
  • Maintains office efficiency by planning and implementing office systems, layouts, and equipment procurement.
  • Designs and implements office policies by establishing standards and procedures; measuring results against standards; making necessary adjustments.
  • Completes operational requirements by scheduling and assigning employees; following up on work results.
  • Keeps management informed by reviewing and analyzing special reports; summarizing information; identifying trends.
  • Maintains office staff by recruiting, selecting, orienting, and training employees.
  • Maintains office staff job results by coaching, counseling, and disciplining employees; planning, monitoring, and appraising job results.
  • Maintains professional and technical knowledge by attending educational workshops; reviewing professional publications; establishing personal networks; participating in professional societies.
  • Achieves financial objectives by preparing an annual budget; scheduling expenditures; analyzing variances; initiating corrective actions.
  • Contributes to team effort by accomplishing related results as needed.

That’s A LOT of skills! Within that one job description, I see that an office manager does payroll, reporting, employee coaching, scheduling, management, networking and budgeting.  Think of all the different careers where those skills would fit: finance, HR, meeting planning, project management and more! A person with all those skills should have multiple resumes for different types of positions to give them more opportunities for finding a job. By expanding your search, you never know what kinds of new opportunities might come your way.

Experienced job seekers often struggle to navigate today’s market because it has become so competitive and so anonymous. But by showcasing your strongest skills in different areas and continually working to update and modernize your skills, you’ll stand a much better chance of catching the eye of a recruiter and landing a job.

Reposted from Job Search Success 

Alabama’s Justice Reinvestment Approach

May 21, 2015

Faced with the most crowded prison system in the nation and overwhelmed probation and parole systems, state leaders in Alabama pursued justice reinvestment. After extensive analyses identified key challenges in the state’s criminal justice system, policymakers developed a policy framework designed to reduce prison overcrowding and strengthen community-based supervision. Justice reinvestment legislation was enacted in May 2015 and is projected to avert $380 million in construction and operations cost by FY2021.

To download a PDF of the report, click here.

President Obama said Monday he was directing federal agencies to “ban the box” in their hiring decisions,

WASHINGTON — President Obama said Monday he was directing federal agencies to “ban the box” in their hiring decisions, prohibiting them from asking prospective government employees about their criminal histories on job applications.

Speaking at R635820813188886161-AFP-546001430-77236944utgers University in Newark, N.J., where he highlighted programs meant to ease the reentry of former inmates into society, Obama said the federal government “should not use criminal history to screen out applicants before we even look at their qualifications.”

It’s unclear how many federal agencies would be affected by Obama’s action. Many agencies already delay asking about criminal history until later in the hiring process, but Obama is directing the Office of Personnel Management to issue guidance making that practice universal across the federal government.

“It is relevant to find out whether somebody has a criminal record. We’re not suggesting ignore it,” Obama said. “What we are suggesting is that when it comes to the application, give folks a chance to get through the door. Give them a chance to get in there so they can make their case.”

And while civil rights groups applauded the move, many had hoped for an even more sweeping executive order. The American Civil Liberties Union called the move “an important first step,” but called on him to follow up with an order that would apply not only to federal employees, but federal contractors. Obama has used 15 similar orders during his presidency to force companies doing business with the government to raise the minimum wage, adopt non-discrimination policies and grant workers
paid time off.

While the president is with us in spirit, his administration is not yet ready to make an executive order a reality,” said Wade Henderson of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights.

White House spokesman Frank Benenati said the president prefers congressional action o
n contractors  “as the best path forward for making sure this effort will have the most significant impact and is written into law so it can last beyond this administration.”

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., who is sponsoring that legislation with Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., said Monday that he’s “really happy to see the president continue to push the envelope” and bring attention to the issue.

But the ban-the-box effort, he said,  “should be done legislatively, so that the stroke of another president’s pen can’t undo it.”

Obama highlighted offender reentry programs Monday in New Jersey as part of a nationwide tour to build support for Congress to overhaul the criminal justice system.

His first stop in Newark was a tour of Integrity House, a halfway house and drug rehabilitation center that gets 85% of its referrals from the criminal justice system. Meeting with former prison inmates who are now residents of the house, Obama said the center does “outstanding work with folks with addiction issues,” and said he hoped his visit would “highlight what is working” across the country.

Obama highlighted the story of Dquan Rosario, who served time in prison for drugs but then, at age 37, went back to school and is now an emergency medical technician in Newark. Obama said Rosario’s story shows it’s never too late for a second chance.

“There are people who have gone through tough times. They’ve made mistakes. But with a little bit of help, they can get on the right path. That is what we have to invest in, that is what we need to believe in,” Obama said.

To Prison for Poverty

This is happening today ,right now. People are being jailed and forced to pay exorbitant amounts of monies for minor crimes to line the pockets of for profit business.  Alabama ,Georgia, and Florida . Let your congressman/woman  and Governor know that this is not acceptable. New legislation needs to be passed.

Obama plans clemency for hundreds of drug offenders

 

PRESIDENTIAL MERCY

As a candidate and civil rights law professor, President Barack Obama had spoken out about the need to reform the criminal-justice system, and clearly felt passionately about entrenched racial biases that resulted in people being treated unfairly by the courts based solely on the color of their skin. But in his crowded first term, his only foray into criminal justice was encouraging lawmakers to pass the Fair Sentencing Act, which he signed in 2010, to reduce the sentencing disparity between crack and powder cocaine. The disparity had the effect of punishing black drug offenders far more harshly than white ones, and was widely accepted to be outdated and unfair. (Obama’s clemency push is meant to correct a broad set of inequities in the criminal-justice system, not just those that are racial. Scrivner, who might benefit from the program, is white.)

When it came to using his only unfettered presidential power — to pardon felons and to reduce the sentences of prisoners — Obama was incredibly stingy in his first term. Vanita Gupta, deputy legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, calls his record on mercy “abysmal.” He pardoned just 22 people — fewer than any modern president — and commuted the sentence of just one. An applicant for commutation like Scrivner had just a 1-in-5,000 chance of getting a reduced sentence with Obama in his first term — compared with a 1-in-100 chance under Presidents Reagan and Clinton, according to an analysis by ProPublica.

According to former and current administration officials, the fault for this lay mostly at the feet of the Office of the Pardon Attorney, a small corner of the Justice Department that sifts through thousands of pardon and commutation petitions each year. The pardon attorney, former military judge Ronald Rodgers, sends his recommendations of whether or not to grant the petitions to the Deputy Attorney General’s office, which then sends them on to the White House. The pardon attorney was recommending that the president deny nearly every single petition for a pardon or a reduced sentence, according to one senior official in the Obama administration.

But even though the president was almost certainly aware that the pardon process was deeply flawed, he took no steps to fix it. In 2009, Obama’s top lawyer, Gregory Craig, drafted a proposal urging a more aggressive use of the presidential pardon and clemency power, and calling the current system broken. One of Craig’s recommendations was to take the pardon attorney’s office out of the Department of Justice entirely, so that the people vetting clemency petitions were not so close to the system that put prisoners away in the first place.

“I was of the belief that the current system for making pardon decisions was broken and it needed to be reformed,” Craig said. His suggested reforms weren’t implemented, and he left the White House that year.

Craig wasn’t the only one to raise concerns to the White House early in Obama’s tenure. A staffer in the pardon attorney’s office, Sam Morison, wrote to a West Wing attorney to blow the whistle on his own office shortly after Attorney General Eric Holder gave a speech in February 2009 saying America is a “nation of cowards” on race. The attorney general mentioned entrenched racial injustices in the criminal-justice system. In the spirit of that concern, Morison wrote, “I must bring to your attention the near total collapse of the pardon advisory process.” He added that the pardon attorney’s dysfunction disproportionately affected minorities, whosepardon petitions were far less likely to be approved than whites’ over the years. Morison said the desire to reject petitions was so institutionally ingrained at the office that the president would never effectively be able to use his pardon power. No one replied to his memo.

The spirit of criminal-justice reform that interested the president had not trickled down to the pardon attorney. “There’s all this bipartisan reform going on, but you have these people down there in their own little insular world and they just don’t get it,” one senior administration official said of the pardon attorney’s office.

Near the end of his first term, Obama expressed his frustration with how few positive clemency petitions were landing on his desk. He began meeting with White House Counsel Kathy Ruemmler and Holder to discuss how his pardon power could fit into his larger strategy of making the criminal-justice system fairer. (In mid-December, Holder followed up with a memo to Obama laying out his priorities for a second term in which he endorsed a more robust use of the pardon power as part of a broader criminal-justice reform initiative.) Over a series of five or 10 discussions, the president said he wanted more recommendations for pardons and commutations getting to his desk. The president complained that the pardon attorney’s office favored petitions from wealthy and connected people, who had good lawyers and knew how to game the system. The typical felon recommended for clemency by the pardon attorney was a hunter who wanted a pardon so that he could apply for a hunting license.

Meanwhile, the pardon attorney became the target of a scathing Justice Department Inspector General report in December 2012, furthering the suspicion in the White House that the culture of the office was to reflexively deny petitions. Rodgers fell “substantially short of the high standards to be expected of Department of Justice employees and of the duty he owed to the President of the United States,” the Inspector General said. The report concluded that Rodgers misrepresented the facts to the White House of a commutation request from Clarence Aaron, a man serving a triple life sentence for facilitating a drug deal. The pardon attorney’s advice to the president to deny the grant, even though the prosecutor and judge supported it, “was colored by his concern … that the White House might grant Aaron clemency presently and his desire that this not happen,” the report concluded.

A year later, and after prodding from the Obama administration, the pardon attorney’s office finally sent the president recommendations to commute the sentences of eight people serving life or near-life sentences for drug crimes, including Aaron. None of the eight people was politically connected or wealthy, traits that the president wants to avoid rewarding with his clemency power. A year after Rodgers was taken to task for denying Aaron’s petition, Obama freed Aaron and seven others from prison. According to Ruemmler, the commutations were a message that the president was serious about wanting to see more clemency recommendations.

Even with these eight, Obama has granted just 10 commutations out of 10,000 requests. He granted 52 of the 1,600 pardon requests that made it to his desk. But a new initiative he directed the Justice Department to begin this spring might increase that number by hundreds, or even thousands.

Obama plans clemency for hundreds of drug offenders

DUBLIN, Calif—Scrawled on the inside of Barbara Scrivner’s left arm is a primitive prison tattoo that says “Time Flies.”

If only that were the case.

For Scrivner, time has crawled, it’s dawdled, and on bad days, it’s felt like it’s stood completely still. She was 27 years old when she started serving a 30-year sentence in federal prison for selling a few ounces of methamphetamine. Now, 20 years later, she feels like she’s still living in the early ’90s—she’s never seen or touched a cellphone, she still listens to her favorite band, the Scorpions, and she carefully coats her eyelids in electric blue eye shadow in the morning.

It’s out there, outside of prison, where time flies.

On a sunny afternoon at a federal prison outside San Francisco last month, Scrivner nervously clutched a manila envelope full of photos of herself and her daughter that she keeps in her cell. As she displays the pictures, Scrivner’s daughter Alannah, who was just 2 years old when her mom was put away, changes from a redheaded, freckled young kid to a sullen teen to a struggling young mom. Scrivner changes in the photos, too. At first she’s a plump-cheeked beauty with chestnut-brown hair, then she’s a bleached-blonde woman in her early 30s, before becoming increasingly gaunt as the years grind on.

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