Monthly Archives: December 2013

Meet the Center for Community Alternatives & Deputy Director Josefina Bastidas

Root & Rebound

Root & Rebound had an incredible meeting in NYC a couple of weeks back with Josefina Bastidas, Esq., Deputy Director for the New York City offices at the Center for Community Alternatives (CCA) in downtown Brooklyn. Immediately upon walking through their office doors, we felt and were treated like CCA family. During our visit, Josefina introduced us to some of CCA’s social work clinicians, attorneys, program and service directors, administrative support staff, and mentors. Every person greeted us with kindness and support. CCA’s positive work culture and community impact radiated from every person we met.

CCA promotes reintegrative justice and a reduced reliance on incarceration through advocacy, direct services, and public policy development in pursuit of civil and human rights. CCA works with people who would otherwise be incarcerated—men, women, and youth—and provides an alternative to incarceration. In an average year, CCA successfully diverts 400 people from more costly incarceration…

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Check ’em out: Homeboy Industries in L.A.

Root & Rebound

While visiting reentry programs and advocates in Los Angeles, we were very impressed by the model at Homeboy Industries. Homeboy Industries serves high-risk, formerly gang-involved and formerly incarcerated men and women with a continuum of free services and programs. Homeboy Industries also operates seven social enterprises that serve as job-training sites to program participants known as “trainees”. Their model of entrepreneurship and small business is an innovative way for supporting formerly incarcerated people in reentry. The model began because formerly incarcerated and formerly gang-involved men and women who had been working with Father Greg Boyle, their local priest and the founder of Homeboy Industries, were fed up – There are no jobs for us. Employers won’t hire us because of our tattoos or conviction histories. Everyone else sees our past as we are simply trying to move our lives forward. From these community concerns, the model of social enterprise at Homeboy…

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Embrace what makes YOU Unique

“When I started my music career, I was a maid. I used to clean houses. My mother was a proud janitor. My stepfather, who raised me like his very own, worked at the post office and my father was a trashman. They all wore uniforms and that’s why I stand here today, in my black and white, and I wear my uniform to honor them.This is a reminder that I have work to do. I have people to uplift. I have people to inspire. And today, I wear my uniform proudly as a Cover Girl. I want to be clear, young girls, I didn’t have to change who I was to become a Cover Girl. I didn’t have to become perfect because I’ve learned throughout my journey that perfection is the enemy of greatness.

Embrace what makes you unique, even if it makes others uncomfortable.” – Janelle Monáe

#PARENTS If you have little girls, please read this speech:</p> <p>"When I started my music career, I was a maid. I used to clean houses. My mother was a proud janitor. My stepfather, who raised me like his very own, worked at the post office and my father was a trashman. They all wore uniforms and that’s why I stand here today, in my black and white, and I wear my uniform to honor them.</p> <p>This is a reminder that I have work to do. I have people to uplift. I have people to inspire. And today, I wear my uniform proudly as a Cover Girl. I want to be clear, young girls, I didn’t have to change who I was to become a Cover Girl. I didn’t have to become perfect because I’ve learned throughout my journey that perfection is the enemy of greatness.</p> <p>Embrace what makes you unique, even if it makes others uncomfortable." - Janelle Monáe