March is National Women’s History Month -Celebrate !!

I am the founder of a 501(c)3 service organization to women. the organization is  called Woman2Woman Empowerment. Our mission is to assist women to become positive, prayerful and powerful in our homes, communities and churches. Visit our site www.woman2womanempowerment.org to learn more about what we do. We are always seeking volunteers.

Empowerment refers to increasing the spiritual, political, social, educational, gender, or economic strength of individuals and communities.

The process which enables individuals/groups to fully access personal/collective power, authority and influence, and to employ that strength when engaging with other people, institutions or society. In other words, “Empowerment is not giving people power, people already have plenty of power, in the wealth of their knowledge and motivation, to do their jobs magnificently. We define empowerment as letting this power out (Blanchard, K).” It encourages people to gain the skills and knowledge that will allow them to overcome obstacles in life or work environment and ultimately, help them develop within themselves or in the society.

To empower a female “…sounds as though we are dismissing or ignoring males, but the truth is, both genders desperately need to be equally empowered.” (Dr. Asa Don Brown) Empowerment occurs through improvement of conditions, standards, events, and a global perspective of life.

The month of March has been designated as Women’s History Month. This month has been designated as such to commemorate and celebrate the contributions of women to our world.  I have compiled some info on Women’s History Month  that you might not know.  take the quiz and learn more about women in our history.  I hope that you become personally empowered by learning more about the contributions of women. Personal empowerment will compel you to make a difference in the world you live in.

History of National Women’s History Month

 

By Molly Murphy MacGregor, Executive Director and Cofounder

National Women’s History Project

Local Celebrations

As recently as the 1970’s, women’s history was virtually an unknown topic in the K-12 curriculum or in general public consciousness. To address this situation, the Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (California) Commission on the Status of Women initiated a “Women’s History Week” celebration for 1978.

 

The week March 8th, International Women’s Day, was chosen as the focal point of the observance. The local Women’s History Week activities met with enthusiastic response, and dozens of schools planned special programs for Women’s History Week. Over one-hundred community women participated by doing special presentations in classrooms throughout the country and an annual “Real Woman” Essay Contest drew hundreds of entries. The finale for the week was a celebratory parade and program held in the center of downtown Santa Rosa, California.

 

Mobilizing a Movement

In 1979, Molly Murphy MacGregor, a member of our group, was invited to participate in The Women’s History Institute at Sarah Lawrence College, which was chaired by noted historian, Gerda Lerner and attended by the national leaders of organizations for women and girls. When the participants learned about the success of the Sonoma County’s Women’s History Week celebration, they decided to initiate similar celebrations within their own organizations, communities, and school districts. They also agreed to support an effort to secure a “National Women’s History Week.”

Presidential and Congressional Support

The first steps toward success came in February 1980 when President Carter issued the first Presidential Proclamation declaring the Week of March 8th 1980 as National Women’s History Week. In the same year, Representative Barbara Mikulski, who at the time was in the House of Representatives, and Senator Orrin Hatch co-sponsored a Congressional Resolution for National Women’s History Week 1981. This co-sponsorship demonstrated the wide-ranging political support for recognizing, honoring, and celebrating the achievements of American women.

A National Lobbying Effort

As word spread rapidly across the nation, state departments of education encouraged celebrations of National Women’s History Week as an effective means to achieving equity goals within classrooms. Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, Oregon, Alaska, and other states developed and distributed curriculum materials for all of their public schools. Organizations sponsored essay contests and other special programs in their local areas. Within a few years, thousands of schools and communities were celebrating National Women’s History Week, supported and encouraged by resolutions from governors, city councils, school boards, and the U.S. Congress.

Each year, the dates of National Women’s History Week, (the week of March 8th) changed and every year a new lobbying effort was needed. Yearly, a national effort that included thousands of individuals and hundreds of educational and women’s organizations was spearheaded by the National Women’s History Project.

National Women’s History Month

By 1986, 14 states had already declared March as Women’s History Month. This momentum and state-by-state action was used as the rational to lobby Congress to declare the entire month of March 1987 as National Women’s History Month. In 1987, Congress declared March as National Women’s History Month in perpetuity. A special Presidential Proclamation is issued every year which honors the extraordinary achievements of American women.

 

Presidential Message 1980

President Jimmy Carter’s Message to the nation designating March 2-8, 1980 as National Women’s History Week.

“From the first settlers who came to our shores, from the first American Indian families who befriended them, men and women have worked together to build this nation. Too often the women were unsung and sometimes their contributions went unnoticed. But the achievements, leadership, courage, strength and love of the women who built America was as vital as that of the men whose names we know so well.

As Dr. Gerda Lerner has noted, “Women’s History is Women’s Right.” – It is an essential and indispensable heritage from which we can draw pride, comfort, courage, and long-range vision.”

I ask my fellow Americans to recognize this heritage with appropriate activities during National Women’s History Week, March 2-8, 1980.

I urge libraries, schools, and community organizations to focus their observances on the leaders who struggled for equality – – Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Lucy

Stone, Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Harriet Tubman, and Alice Paul.

Understanding the true history of our country will help us to comprehend the need for full equality under the law for all our people.

This goal can be achieved by ratifying the 27th Amendment to the United States Constitution, which states that “Equality of Rights under the Law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.”Can You Identify These Women of Great Vision and Achievement Whose History Is Our Strength

1. Who became the first female Secretary of State of the United States, appointed by President Clinton in 1997?

2.Who took over management of Columbia Sportswear Company in the late 1930’s, when it was near bankruptcy, and turned it into the largest American ski apparel company worth $4 billion in 1972?

3.Who was the first woman in modern history to lead a major Native-American tribe, the Cherokee Nation?

4. Who was the first American woman poet whose poetry was published in London in 1650?

5.Who is considered the first American woman to be ordained by full denominational authority in 1864, and who also campaigned vigorously for full woman suffrage?

6. Who was the first woman of color elected to the U.S. Congress and was a founding member of the National Women’s Political Caucus?

7. Who was the ecologist writer whose path breaking book, “Silent Spring” in 1962 initiated the environmental movement?

8.Who was the first black woman and the youngest poet laureate in American history when she was appointed in 1993?

9. Who was imprisoned and then hanged for her Quaker faith in Boston in 1660, and 400 years later her statue was placed in front of the state House?

10. Who was the female lawyer who worked for equal rights and suffrage, co-founded the ACLU in 1910, and helped write the Equal Rights Amendment?

11. Who led the fight to criminalize lynching, helped form the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), and aided many black people who migrated from the South to Chicago?

12. Who became the first female president of Harvard University when she was named its 28th president in 2007?

13. Who became the first woman vice-president candidate on a major political party ticket when selected in 1984?

14. Who volunteered as a nurse during the Civil War, earning the nickname “Mother,” and after peace became an attorney advocating for veterans?

15. Who was the United States delegate to the United Nations who championed and won approval of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948?

16. Who earned a graduate degree from Oberlin College in 1888, was the first black woman to serve on a Board of Education (in D.C.), sued to integrate restaurants in the 1950’s, integrated the American Association of University Women at age 85, and was a founding member of NAACP?

17. Who wrote “The Feminine Mystique” in 1968 and became a leading figure in the Women’s Movement?

18. Who was the first woman promoted to brigadier general in the U.S. Air Force (1971) and the first female major general in any armed forces in 1973?

19. Who was a Rear Admiral in the U.S. Navy credited with developing the COBOL computer language, and with coining the phrase “debugging” to fix a computer?

20. Who was one of the first black physicians in New York City and the first black woman to graduate from Bellevue Hospital medical school in 1926?

21.Who was the free-thinking woman who was forced out of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and sought sanctuary in Roger Williams’ Rhode Island in 1637?

22. Who is the architect of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., which she designed when she was only 21 years old?

23. Who wrote the path-breaking book, “On Death and Dying” in 1969 which educated and supported helpers who provide compassionate care?

24.Who was the American founder and leader of the Shakers in the 1770’s who advocated equality, individual responsibility and peace?

25.What woman ran for president on the National Equal Rights Party, receiving 4,149 votes in 6 states in 1884?

26. Who was the first woman to win an unshared Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 1983 for her discovery that genes can change positions on the chromosome?

27. Who led the fight to integrate military nursing services in WW II and then achieved the integration of the American Nurses Association in 1948?

28. Who was the U.S. president’s wife who saved historic paintings when the British army burned the White House in 1814?

29. Who is the first American woman to win the Nobel Prize in physics in 1963 after she discovered the structure of atoms?

30. Who is the longest-serving female U.S. senator, elected in 1986?

31. Who was the astronomer who discovered a comet, named for her, on October 1, 1847, and who was the first woman elected to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1850), and the first professor of astronomy at Vassar College?

32. Who was first black woman lawyer in the United States and the first woman admitted to District of Columbia bar in 1872?

33. What woman met Elizabeth Cady Stanton at the International Anti-Slavery Convention in London in 1840 and worked with her for women’s equality for the next half century?

34. Who worked with W.E.B. DuBois’ Niagara Movement and was one of the few white co-founders of NAACP in 1910?

35. What woman attended the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848, signed the Declaration of Sentiments, and lived to see women win the vote in 1920?

36. Who ran a plantation in South Carolina and successfully introduced the cultivation of indigo as a commercial staple?

37. Who was the first black prima donna soprano at the Metropolitan Opera, starring from 1961 to 2007, the first black singer to earn the top fee of $2750 for each performance (second only to Birgit Nilsson who got $3000), and winner of 19 Grammy awards?

38. Who became the first female rabbi in the U.S. and the second in the world when she was ordained in Cincinnati in 1972?

39. Who sculpted the full scale marble statue of Lincoln which is in the Capitol Rotunda, becoming the first female and youngest artist to receive a commission from the government for a statue?

40. Who was the first black woman symphonic composer to have a symphony performed by a major orchestra – her Symphony in E Minor was performed in 1933 by the Chicago Symphony?

41. Who was the Zionist leader who founded Hadassah, an organization working on health issues for Jewish people in Palestine, and also rescued thousands of children from Germany in the 1930’s?

42. Who was the female Brigadier General who was the driving force behind the establishment of the Women in Military Service for America Memorial Building in Arlington Cemetery which opened in 1997?

43. What woman wrote the first novel by an American to sell more than a million copies, “The Wide, Wide World”?

44. Who was the friend of Abigail Adams who fostered political agitation with her satirical plays and then a three-volume history of the American revolution in 1805?

45. Who was the first Native American to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963 for her work in decreasing infant mortality and decreasing tuberculosis?

46. Who was the author of “Our Nig,” published in 1859, the first novel by a black person in English, which described racism in the treatment of free blacks in the North by abolitionists?

47. Who was the first woman mountaineer to climb over 23,000 feet on Nun Kun in the Himalayas in 1906, a record unbroken until 1934?

48. Who is the first woman conductor of a large orchestra, the Baltimore Symphony, appointed in 2007?

49. Who introduced America to French cooking in her books and television series from 1963 through the 1990’s?

50. What woman has won a total of 56 Grand Slam tennis competitions events and 9 Wimbledon women’s singles titles?

Find the answers here-http://www.nwhp.org/whm/test.php

 

Advertisements

One thought on “March is National Women’s History Month -Celebrate !!

  1. Pingback: Presidential Proclamation — Women’s History Month, 2013 | Democratic Women's Club of Miami-Dade County

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.